Graduate Student Handbook

CONTENTS:

I. THE GRADUATE PROGRAM:

A. MASTER’S DEGREE

Admission Requirements; Course Requirements; Culminating Exam; M.A. Thesis Option; Graduation; Student Learning Outcomes for M.A. (Plan A and B) Students in Philosophy

B. DOCTORAL DEGREE

Admission Requirements; Application for the Ph.D. Program from the M.A. Program; Advanced Standing for Ph.D. Students entering from the UHM M.A. Program in Philosophy; Course Requirements; Distribution Requirements; Admission to Candidacy; Canonical Texts Exam; Language Requirements; Dissertation; Graduation; Student Learning Outcomes for Ph.D. in Philosophy; Dissertation File

II. POLICIES:

A. Satisfactory Progress

B. Incompletes

C. Residency

D. Leaves of Absence

E. Registration

F. Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policy Statement

G. Sexual Harassment

H. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

I. Records

J. Courses and Seminars

K. Credit/No Credit Option

III. FINANCIAL AID:

A. WICHE Western Regional Graduate Program

B. Graduate Assistantships

C. Graduate Division Tuition Waivers

D. East-West Center Scholarships

E. International Student Services Scholarships

F. National Resource Scholarships for Foreign Language and Area Studies

G. Fellowships and Scholarships

H. Some Tips on How to Get a Grant

IV. OTHER FACILITIES:

A. Graduate Division

B. University of Hawai‘i Libraries

C. Bulletin Boards

D. Mail

E. UH Mānoa Office of the OMBUDS

F. ASUH Mediation Service

G. Graduate Student Organization (GSO)

 

 

I. THE GRADUATE PROGRAM:

The Department offers graduate training leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. Students are accepted into the Ph.D. program only if they have already received an M.A. in Philosophy or the equivalent from an accredited institution and have met any other departmental requirements.

 

The M.A. program is designed to serve both those who intend to go on to work in philosophy at the doctoral level at the University of Hawai‘i at Mãnoa, and those who wish to pursue philosophical studies beyond the baccalaureate level for other reasons. It can provide philosophical training of interdisciplinary relevance for students intending to work in other scholarly areas, in business or in the professions, as well as for those wishing to teach in schools or community colleges.

 

Although the Western philosophical tradition remains the fundamental frame of reference for the Department, the opportunity provided for specialization in the area of Asian philosophy is unique in that UH is the only institution of higher learning in the U.S. with a regular program leading to the Ph.D. degree with areas of specialization in Islamic, Indian, Buddhist, Chinese, Japanese, and comparative philosophy. Whatever their field of specialization, graduate students intending to complete a Ph.D. in philosophy at UHM must acquire a thorough knowledge of the history and problems of Western philosophy. On the basis of this foundation, students may further specialize in one of three areas of study: Western philosophy, Asian philosophy, or comparative philosophy. The area of comparative philosophy is the most demanding; at the Ph.D. level its requirements include proficiency in both the Western and Asian fields. The candidate is expected to gain a mastery of some specific topic that can be approached through the resources of two or more philosophic traditions. All graduate students shall develop their course of study in consultation with the chair of the graduate program.

 

The M.A. and Ph.D. in Asian philosophy are recognized Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) regional graduate programs. Residents of Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming are eligible, on admission, to enroll at Hawai‘i-resident tuition rates.

 

A. MASTER’S DEGREE

While a thesis option is available, the M.A. program primarily emphasizes coursework.

 

Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the M.A. program must have a B.A. degree, including the equivalent of 30 credits in philosophy. Students may be admitted provisionally with fewer than 30 credits; however, all undergraduate deficiencies must be eliminated prior to admission to candidacy in the M.A. program.

 

Deficiencies may also be assigned in cases where a student’s background does not include a sufficient number and range of courses in Western philosophy. Deficiencies may be met at the University and should be eliminated in the earliest possible semester. The Graduate Record Examination is required of all students to whom it is accessible in applying for admission to the program. Three letters of recommendation and a sample of the applicant’s written work in philosophy (ideally 12 pages, not more than 20 pages) are required. Applications from U.S. students are due February 1 for the Fall semester and September 1 for the Spring semester. Applications from international students are due January 15 for the Fall semester and August 1 for the Spring semester.

 

Course Requirements

To be eligible for conferral of the Master of Arts degree, a student must maintain a grade-point average of no less than B+ (cumulative 3.3), while completing at least 30 hours of coursework, including no more than 15 credit hours at the upper-divisional undergraduate level, counting PHIL 445 (i.e., at least 15 credit hours must be earned in courses at the 600-/700- level).

 

M.A. students cannot take any of the following courses in philosophy in fulfillment of their Master’s coursework requirements: 301, 302, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 320, 399, 449. Third-year courses which M.A. students can take for credit in fulfillment of their coursework requirements include: 330, 350, 360, 370, 380. Any third-year course that is listed here as unavailable to M.A. students may be available if the M.A. student wishing to take it can present to the Graduate Chair a suitable case for its appropriateness. Also required for the M.A. degree are four semesters (or the demonstrated equivalent) of at least one philosophically significant foreign language, typically: classical Greek, Latin, French, German, Arabic, classical Chinese, Japanese, Sanskrit, or Pali. (NB: If a student finishes all philosophy coursework requirements for the M.A. in three semesters–as opposed to the usual four–the student in question will only be required to complete three semesters’ worth of language courses.) Those intending to go on to pursue a Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Hawai‘i must include among the 10 courses required for the M.A. (a) at least one course (which can be either a Western-focus or a comparative, but not an Asian-focus, course) in the field represented by metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of science (or MELPOS); (b) at least one course (which can be either a Western-focus or a comparative, but not an Asian-focus, course), in the field represented by political, ethical or social theory, and aesthetics (or PESTAE); and (c) at least three text-intensive, Western-focus courses in the history of philosophy. For a course to satisfy this last designation, it must be dedicated to a close and thorough (that is, complete or almost complete, and with due attention paid to historical context) reading of a restricted number of key texts by one to three (related) authors writing prior to 1940.

 

Students for whom a more flexible program of study would be more appropriate should work with the graduate chair and a faculty adviser to select a program of coursework around an area of concentration.

 

The Department has particular strength and depth in Asian philosophy, ethics, and philosophy of law, but given the diversity of faculty expertise, students could develop many other foci, such as environmental or feminist philosophy, while including the contribution of one or more of the Asian or Islamic traditions to their area of interest. When appropriate, students may, after approval of the graduate chair, count up to three courses (9 credits) from other departments toward their M.A. in Philosophy. If, however, a student opts to write an M.A. thesis, a maximum of two courses (6 credits) from other departments may be counted toward the M.A. in Philosophy.

 

The 30 hours of coursework required for the M.A., can include no more that 12 credit hours of upper division undergraduate courses (300- and 400- level) regardless of department. At least 21 credit hours must be for philosophy courses, of which at least 9 credit hours must be at the graduate level (600- and 700-level). Should a student taking this more flexible approach to the M.A. decide that they would like to continue to the Ph.D. in Philosophy at UHM, their coursework will need to satisfy all the appropriate distribution requirements. Thus they may need to take additional coursework, over and above the normal 30 credit hours, in order to satisfy the distribution requirements for the M.A.

 

Culminating Exam

To complete the M.A., each candidate will submit three seminar papers (one of which must have been subjected to significant revision, and which is to be submitted in both revised and unrevised forms as evidence of this) to an examining committee in order to demonstrate the scope of the work the student has done toward the M.A. (NB: A student who has been admitted into the M.A. program with advanced standing may, at the discretion of the Department’s Examination Coordinator, be allowed to submit just two seminar papers–one of which must have been significantly revised –for this purpose.) These papers will be read by a committee of three examiners. The culminating exam is an oral exam focusing primarily on one of those papers submitted. (However, if the examiners so desire, they may raise secondary questions relating to the other papers, as well.) The selection of the focus-paper will be made by the examining committee, which will inform the candidate of its choice a few days before the exam is to take place. The exam is expected to last 30-60 minutes and is not public. In order to receive the M.A. degree, the student must pass this examination. A “pass with distinction” will be required of those seeking admission to the doctoral program. Admission to the doctoral program will continue to be determined in accordance with existing departmental criteria. This M.A. examination will be scheduled in the last week or two of classes in either the Fall or Spring semester. Papers must be submitted to the examining committee at least three weeks before the exam is to take place. The membership of the examining committee is to be determined by the Department’s Examination Coordinator in consultation with the candidate.

 

M.A. Thesis Option

A student in the M.A. program may (conditional upon the availability of an appropriate faculty supervisor), but need not, choose to write an M.A. thesis in his or her final semester(s). Six credits will be granted toward the thirty credits of required coursework for completion of the thesis. Taking advantage of the M.A. thesis option does not affect either the coursework distribution requirements of the M.A. or one’s obligation to complete PHIL 445 (or equivalent), but it does reduce–from fifteen credits to twelve credits–the number of hours of coursework that one can take at the upper-divisional undergraduate level. A student is not permitted to begin work on the M.A. thesis until such time as he or she has completed 18 credits of coursework in the M.A. program. Finally, a student who opts to write the M.A. thesis will not be required to take the culminating exam. Instead, there will be a defense of the thesis before a committee of four professors and, in order for a student to be eligible for admission to the doctoral program, he or she must pass this defense “with distinction.” [NB: A student may choose to produce an M.A. thesis in either the Fall or the Spring semester of an academic year.] The student is required to deposit a copy of his/her thesis in the Moore Reading Room, bound by Hawai‘i Library Binding Services (1316 Mo‘okaula, Honolulu, Hawai’i 96817, 566-9447).

 

Graduation

Graduating M.A. students must file degree applications in order to graduate. Please refer to the UH Catalog for due dates. To file for graduation, students may download and print the Graduate Application for

Degree form from the Web site < http://Mānoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms&gt; and hand carry it to Graduate Records, Spalding 352.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for M.A. (Plan A and B) Students in Philosophy

o Students acquire basic proficiency in at least one philosophically significant language other than English

o Students are able to conduct research which leads either to a thesis or a significant portfolio of shorter works

o Students demonstrate the ability to write and prepare presentations at a high level of proficiency. Since students come to the program with diverse professional goals, the following outcomes are appropriate for many students but not for all.

o Student is prepared to enter a Ph.D. program.

o Student is prepared to teach philosophy at the junior college level.

o Students are prepared to enter a graduate-level professional school.

 

B. DOCTORAL DEGREE

The doctoral program consists of two stages. The first stage is that leading to admission to candidacy; the second, to the awarding of the degree. Normally, the first involves at least two years of coursework beyond the M.A. in preparation for departmental and language exams. The second stage involves writing a dissertation and passing an oral examination in its defense. Students must attain certification for Ph.D. candidacy–must, that is, fulfill all the requirements for the Ph.D. except for the writing and oral defense of the dissertation–within four years of admission to the Ph.D. program.

 

Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. degree or the equivalent in philosophy and have earned a grade point average of courses taken for the M.A. of not less than 3.3. Students may be required to make up deficiencies upon entry into the Ph.D. program (see requirements for the M.A. degree above). This will be determined by the Graduate Chair in consultation with the Department’s Graduate Admissions Committee. The Graduate Record Examination is required of all students to whom it is accessible in applying for admission to the program. Three letters of recommendation and a sample of the applicant’s written work in philosophy (ideally 12 pages, not more than 20 pages) must accompany the application. Applications from U.S. students are due February 1 for the Fall semester and September 1 for the Spring semester. Applications from international students are due January 15 for the Fall semester and August 1 for the Spring semester.

 

NB: In order to be eligible for admission to the Ph.D. program, any student completing an M.A. in

Philosophy at UH Mānoa must have completed PHIL 445 Symbolic Logic with a grade of C or better.

Any incoming Ph.D. student who earned the M.A. at another institution will be expected to complete

PHIL 445 (with a grade of C or better) as soon as possible, unless an equivalent course in logic has already been satisfactorily completed elsewhere. (This requirement may be waived at the Department’s discretion if it is shown that a medically certified disability prevents a student from satisfactorily completing the course and, where appropriate, this is demonstrated by a good faith effort on the part of the student to comply with the requirement in question. Any student who is unable to complete PHIL 445 because of a medically certified disability is not thereby rendered ineligible for a teaching assistantship.)

 

Application for the Ph.D. Program from the M.A. Program

Currently enrolled candidates completing the M.A. degree in Philosophy at the end of the semester may apply for admission to the Ph.D. program in Philosophy by a simple petition. A special form is available for this purpose at the Graduate Records Office, Spalding 352, and must be submitted by the established deadline. Transcripts and the Residence Form are not required in this instance. (Regarding the PHIL 445 requirement, see the paragraph above.) To file an application for the Ph.D. program, students may download and print the Petition for Admission to a Doctorate in the Same Discipline form from the Graduate Division website .< http://Mānoa.hawaii.edu/graduate/content/forms >. If this application is approved by the Graduate Chair, the student is encouraged to hand carry it to Graduate Records, Spalding 352.

 

Advanced Standing for Ph.D. Students entering from the UHM M.A. Program in Philosophy

Students who have completed their M.A. degrees in philosophy at UHM are allowed to count two of the courses they completed in satisfaction of the M.A. coursework requirements towards the satisfaction of their Ph.D. coursework requirements. One of these two courses may be counted toward satisfaction of the history distribution requirement. Of the remaining 24 credits worth of coursework in philosophy that they must complete in satisfying the Ph.D. coursework requirement, a minimum of 15 credits must be taken as graduate seminars (i.e., 600- or 700- level courses).

 

Course Requirements

To be eligible for conferral of the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a student must maintain a grade point average of not less than B+ (cumulative 3.3), while completing at least 30 hours of coursework beyond the M.A., which may be Western, non-Western, or comparative in nature. Ph.D. students may count up to 12 credit hours at the upper-divisional undergraduate (400) level towards their required 30 hours of coursework. Ph.D. students cannot take any third-year courses in philosophy in fulfillment of their doctoral coursework requirements. Nor can they take the undergraduate Philosophy majors’ capstone course–PHIL 449.

 

Directed Research, PHIL 699V, may be used for (a) independent research; (b) remedial work; and (c) supplementary work. PHIL 699V is not normally to be taken by M.A. students. No more than 12 hours of PHIL 699V may be counted as credit for the Ph.D. Students taking PHIL 699V must meet with their instructor at least three times during the semester and must either take an examination (oral or written) or write a paper on the material covered.

 

Distribution Requirements

Among the 10 courses which Ph.D. students complete in satisfaction of their coursework requirements, they must take at least three text-intensive, Western-focus courses in the history of philosophy. For a course to satisfy this last designation it must be dedicated to a close and thorough (that is, complete or almost complete, and with due attention paid to historical context) reading of a restricted number of key texts by one to three (related) authors writing prior to 1940. They must also take two contemporary issues courses, completing all the assignments necessary to earn normal academic credit for the courses, but also taking and passing the contemporary issues written exam at the end of the course. This exam, which is not open to M.A. students taking the course, is a three-day take-home exam. All students taking the exam for a given course will receive the same set of ten to twelve questions, along with instructions to answer three of those questions, chosen at their own discretion, with in each case a paper about five pages in length.

 

Admission to Candidacy

Students shall pass a canonical area examination administered by a three-person examination committee in consultation with the student in an area related to the subject matter of his or her prospective dissertation. Like the contemporary issues exam, this is a three-day take-home exam, but in this case it is followed by an oral component. The purpose of the canonical area exam is to have a student demonstrate a reasonable degree of competence in a major area of philosophy. In addition, students shall demonstrate proficiency in at least one (and where deemed necessary, two) philosophically significant foreign language(s). Foreign language reading proficiency examinations in East Asian Languages and Languages of Europe and the Americas are administered by the respective departments three times a year:  February, April, October.  Registration forms are available in Spalding 352. Finally, to be admitted to candidacy, a student shall pass a comprehensive oral defense of a thesis proposal.

 

Canonical Texts Exam

The Canonical Texts exam can be taken in any one of the following areas: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and philosophy of language. Once the student has selected an area for examination, the Examination Coordinator will provide the student with the standard list of texts for the canonical exam in that area. The list of core readings should consist of not more than eight texts. Five of these are to be Western classics, which are to be augmented by two or three non-Western texts for those engaged in Asian or comparative philosophy, or by two or three more Western texts for those specializing in Western philosophy. In each area there are five (six in the case of philosophy of science) Western texts specified as the core list. The candidate may, after seeking the Examination Coordinator’s approval, elect to drop one of these in favor of a comparably demanding text of his or her choice. The three additional texts (whether Western or non-Western) are to be selected to suit the specific interests of the candidate. It should be understood by students preparing to write their area exam that faculty members will assume that students have acquired, in addition, at least some familiarity with the relevant secondary literature. In other words, the texts explicitly listed should constitute the starting point for—but not the sum total of–preparatory reading. When wishing to set up a canonical area exam, the candidate should notify the Department Examination Coordinator at least six weeks before he or she wishes the exam to be scheduled. The members of the student’s (canonical) examining committee are to be selected by the Examination Coordinator in consultation with the student. There should be three examiners, and these should represent the faculty members most conversant with the area in question. The candidate, in consultation with the Coordinator, will agree on an examining committee and a list of texts. The convener of the student’s examining committee (who will ordinarily become the chair of the student’s dissertation committee) will be responsible for administering the exam. The convener will solicit questions for the exam from the various members of the examining committee, and will submit these for vetting to the Coordinator. Once the questions are approved, the student may undertake the written portion of the exam. The written exam should be graded by the examiners in a timely fashion in order to facilitate moving on to the oral exam as quickly as possible. A copy of the exam is to be filed with the Coordinator.

 

Exam Format: The candidate will be given a list of 12 questions and allowed 72 hours in which to select and answer three questions. The expectation would be that each answer should not exceed five pages. This written exam will be followed by an oral exam, during which students will be further interrogated, not only with regard to the questions that they wrote on, but also on those questions that they chose not to address. This exam will not be public. A candidate will be allowed to retake the exam once. (A student who fails an area exam for a second time will not be allowed to continue in the doctoral program.)

 

Language Requirements

Students shall demonstrate proficiency in at least one (and, where deemed necessary, two) philosophically significant foreign language(s), typically: classical Greek, Latin, French, German, Arabic, classical Chinese, Japanese, Sanskrit, or Pali. Language proficiency examinations will be conducted through the Graduate Division and the department at UH responsible for teaching that language. (Language proficiency examinations are offered three times a year: in October, February and April. Registration generally occurs six weeks prior to the exam. Please check the bulletin board outside the Graduate Division Records Office, Spalding Hall 352, for notices about these examinations.) If specialist mastery relating to the subject of the student’s dissertation research is required, certification will be conducted by the student’s dissertation committee. Foreign language reading proficiency examinations in East Asian Languages and Languages of Europe and the Americas are administered by the respective departments three times a year:  February, April, October.  Registration forms are available in Spalding 352.

 

Dissertation

A dissertation is expected to be between 50,000 and 75,000 words in length. When a student is ready to form a dissertation committee, the student should first consult the Graduate Chair concerning appropriate faculty members to ask to serve on the committee, given the topic the student has in mind. Only full members of the graduate faculty can serve as the chair of a dissertation committee, but aside from this restriction, the student has complete discretion over which of the Department’s faculty members to choose as their committee’s chair (providing, of course, that the professor in question agrees to serve in this capacity). The student and the dissertation committee chair together will draw up a list of the other committee members. This list will then be provided to the Graduate Chair along with a two- or three- sentence description of the dissertation topic. At the next Department meeting, the Graduate Chair will announce the proposed membership of the new committee and will read out the description of the dissertation topic. If there are no objections raised, the committee membership will be treated as officially approved. If there are any objections raised, the designated chair of the new committee will be asked to explain why the proposed membership is appropriate. If the objections raised are sufficiently serious to require a reconsideration of the committee’s composition, the Graduate Chair and the designated committee chair will meet together with the student to consider ways to address the expressed concerns of the Department. When the Graduate Chair has been satisfied that appropriate changes have been made, the dissertation committee membership will be taken as officially approved. Two principles will be observed whenever it is possible to do so: (1) no faculty member shall be imposed upon a dissertation committee against the student’s expressed wish; and (2) no committee will be deemed satisfactory without pertinent faculty expertise in the subject matter of the dissertation.

 

Approval of the Dissertation Topic: Formal approval of a dissertation topic follows upon completion of the language and first area examinations, but the student should secure the committee’s approval as soon as possible, and in any case within six months of the area examination. The Approval of Dissertation Topic Form IV must be submitted before a student may register for Dissertation 800 credit.

 

Proposal Defense (“Comprehensive Examination”): A detailed dissertation prospectus must be submitted to the committee members and a special conference called to discuss the proposal. If the committee does not approve the proposal, the conference must be repeated.

 

Preliminary Drafts: Preliminary drafts of the dissertation should be submitted to the committee at least six weeks before any proposed defense date. The committee may require changes or additions at its discretion. The committee may also select, at its discretion, an outside reader for the dissertation, an authority in the field not connected with the University of Hawai‘i. The reader’s opinion will be advisory, but the committee may require a revision of the dissertation upon that advice. The committee chair will forward the written evaluation of the outside reader to the Graduate Chair for inclusion in the student’s permanent file.

 

Dissertation Defense: The candidate will proceed to the defense of the dissertation after the committee has given its preliminary approval to a draft. The defense will take the form of an oral examination with all dissertation readers attending. It will render a decision of “pass” or “fail” by majority vote, according to Graduate Division regulations. A member not voting with the majority may request a review following procedures specified in Graduate Division Regulation IV.8.14.4.c. All such defenses are open to the public.

 

Dissertation Records: After the candidate has defended the dissertation, the committee chair will report the result of the defense to the Graduate Chair, who will forward the proper forms, duly signed by all committee members, to Graduate Division for final approval.

 

Final Draft: A completed draft of the dissertation must be typed according to the specifications established by Graduate Division. Copies of the style manual are available from the Graduate Records Office, Spalding Hall 352. Dissertations composed on personal computers may be accepted if they meet the strict requirements of Graduate Division. Generally speaking this means that dot-matrix printers may not be used, hyphenations must be limited in number, widow lines and floating sub-heads must be avoided, etc.

 

Graduate Division requires that two copies of the completed dissertation, properly signed in black ink by the student’s committee members, be submitted to their office.

 

Graduation

Graduating Ph.D. students must file degree applications in order to graduate. Please refer to the UH Catalog for due dates. To file for graduation, students may download and print the Graduate Application for Degree form from the Web site <http://www.hawaii.edu/graduate/download/list.htm&gt; and hand carry it to Graduate Records, Spalding Hall 352.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Ph.D. in Philosophy

o Students demonstrate philosophical reading competence in a philosophically significant language other than English.

o Students demonstrate reading and research competence in English.

o Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the Western philosophical tradition, and where applicable, in a non-Western tradition.

o Students demonstrate their knowledge and ability to participate in a field of contemporary philosophic endeavor.

 

Dissertation File

The Department of Philosophy maintains a complete file of all dissertations written in Philosophy. These are on deposit in the Moore Reading Room and may be consulted by graduate students or faculty. They should prove of considerable value to students concerning the standards expected by the Philosophy Department. Individual dissertations may not be checked out at any time. All writers of Ph.D. dissertations are required to deposit a copy of the completed manuscript, typed according to Graduate Division specifications, and bound in green, in this collection as one of the conditions for certification for their degree. This is in addition to the two copies required by the Graduate Division for deposit in the University Library. The Department requires dissertations to be bound by Hawai‘i Library Binding Services (1316 Mo‘okaula, Honolulu, Hawai‘i, 96817, 566-9447). The student is responsible for binding and delivery charges.

 

II. POLICIES:

 

A. Satisfactory Progress

In addition to meeting the registration and residency requirements, all students must conform to certain criteria which determine satisfactory progress toward completion of the degree program. These are:

 

1. M.A. students are expected to complete their programs within two years, except for part-time students who are allowed up to five years. Two years permit the full-time student abundant opportunity to complete the degree requirements established by the Philosophy Department and Graduate Division. The required PHIL 445 Symbolic Logic course should be taken as soon as possible, and language training should also be demonstrated within the first year. Special circumstances may require that a full-time student, especially one in a field which requires intensive language preparation, take a longer period of time to complete the M.A. degree, but failure to complete the program within three years will be cause for dismissal, as will also be the case for part-time students should they fail to complete the program within five years of matriculation. Note that graduate assistants who take only the minimal six credit-hours’ coursework each semester will not be able to complete their academic work within departmental time limits. You must plan your academic program accordingly.

 

2. Ph.D. students sometimes require a longer period of time to prepare for the proposal defense. In Western philosophy, experience has shown that approximately two years is adequate. In Asian and comparative philosophy, because of the difficulty of language preparation, a longer period of time may be required, especially in the case of graduate assistants. However, those students enjoying scholarships or fellowships which permit the normal 9- to 12-hour credit load should still be able to complete the proposal defense within three years, regardless of the field. Students in all fields who, for compelling reasons, find it impossible to meet the above schedule, shall be eligible for an extension of up to two semesters, subject to approval by the student’s committee chair and the Graduate Chair. After completion of the proposal defense, two more years should be adequate for the research, writing, and defense of the dissertation, assuming that the student is able to pursue the degree full-time. The limit for completion of all requirements for the Ph.D. degree is seven years. This is a regulation of the Graduate Division and cannot be waived by the Philosophy Department.

 

Grades: Each beginning graduate student must have and maintain an average of “B+” (3.3) or better for all academic work. Failure to do so will result in the student’s being placed on probation by Graduate Division. Failure to restore the required “B+” average within one semester of being placed on probation will lead to automatic dismissal from the graduate program. This is a Graduate Division regulation and cannot be waived by the Philosophy Department. In addition, no course in which a Philosophy student receives a grade lower than “C” may form a part of the degree program. Students who wish to apply for financial assistance will be expected to maintain an even higher level of academic achievement, normally a 3.5 average on a 4.0 scale.

 

B. Incompletes

Graduate Division Regulation IV.7.14 stipulates that an incomplete may be given only “to students who fail to complete a small but important part of the semester’s work before the semester grades are determined, if the instructor believes that the failure was caused by conditions beyond the student’s control and not by carelessness or procrastination.” All students must make up incomplete work during the next academic semester according to the deadlines established by Graduate Division. Because incomplete work is an indication that the student is encountering difficulty in meeting the academic standards of the Philosophy Department, a pattern of incompletes will be cause for review of the student’s progress and may lead to a recommendation for dismissal from the program. Moreover, because incomplete work for a graduate assistant is an indication that academic responsibilities are being sacrificed to the function of a graduate assistant, the incomplete may be regarded by the Dean of Graduate Division, who must approve all graduate assistant contracts, as sufficient reason for withholding approval of the contract. Although these requirements may appear to be arbitrary, especially those involving time limitations, they are necessary to ensure the currency of the philosophical knowledge of all students, a vital factor in the training of professional philosophers. Those who fail to meet the above criteria will be recommended for dismissal from the Graduate Program in Philosophy and will receive written notice of such action. A formal response from the student affected is not required. Requests for exceptions will, as always, be in order.

 

C. Residency

Graduate students must be registered in every semester until they complete all degree requirements and fulfill the residency qualifications set forth by Graduate Division, except as stated below in the section, “Leaves of Absence.” Summer registration is not required, but is encouraged, as this will facilitate the completion of the degree program. All students, except those admitted specifically for part-time work, are expected to carry a full academic load. This is defined by Graduate Division as 8-12 credit hours (depending upon course level) for regular students and 6-9 credit hours for graduate assistants.

1. Each student is expected to be registered in at least one graduate seminar throughout the academic coursework phase of the program unless exempted to prepare for the area examination. All graduate assistants are required to be registered as full-time students as a condition of receiving financial aid. In addition, all students, including those who have completed the formal coursework required for a degree, must be registered in the semester in which the degree is taken. These requirements are outlined in the specific degree programs below. Health reasons or approved status as a part-time student may suspend these rules, but the student must write a letter to the Graduate Chair requesting such exemption and stating reasons. The rules concerning approved status as a part-time student follow below.

2. Part-time status is granted automatically to entering students who are employed full-time (40 hours per week) as well as to all senior citizens enrolled for advanced degrees. Part-time status may be granted upon request to those working fewer than 40 hours per week or who have significant childcare or housekeeping responsibilities.

3. Any change from full- to part-time status must have the approval of the Graduate Chair. Possible justification would be pregnancy, child-care obligations, financial hardship, etc.

4. With the approval of the Graduate Chair, students in the part-time category need not register every semester unless they are utilizing the facilities of the University or working under the direction of a member of the Department. However, students who do not maintain continuous enrollment will be required to petition for readmission to the Graduate Program. Readmission will be contingent upon availability of space within the program and upon recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee. To file for readmission, students may download and print the Graduate Admission Application Instructions and Form for Readmission from the Graduate Division website – click here – and hand carry it to Graduate Records, Spalding 352.

5. Part-time status applies only to residency work, not to the belated completion of theses and dissertations. Consequently, in no case may it be used to extend thesis or dissertation completion deadlines for those who have completed their residence.

NB: Official determination of satisfactory completion of residence requirements is made only by Graduate Division. It is the student’s responsibility to have the Graduate Records Office verify completion of the residency requirement.

 

D. Leaves of Absence

Degree candidates may be granted a leave from their studies upon recommendation of the Graduate Chair and approval by the Dean of Graduate Division. A leave of absence is not normally granted for a period longer than one year nor more than once after achieving degree candidacy. The date for return from a leave must be set at the time the leave is requested. Students not returning on time will be required to apply for readmission to the University in accordance with established procedures and regulations. Students on approved leave do not pay tuition fees, time on approved leave is not counted against the time limitations for completion of the degree program, and no readmission procedure is required. Students returning from an approved leave should request the appropriate forms from Graduate Division so that registration materials will be readied. Forms may be obtained in the Graduate Records Office, Spalding 352. Prior to achieving degree candidacy, students do not need to apply for a leave of absence. They must, however, petition for readmission to the degree program. The petition will be evaluated on the same criteria as new admissions.

 

E. Registration

Each student is responsible for registering as soon as possible in order to facilitate finalizing the Department’s schedule. At the beginning of each semester, each graduate student is expected to inform the Department of his or her current address and telephone number. This is important, since in the past students have missed out on graduate assistantships and other forms of financial aid as a result of not keeping the Department abreast of changes in this regard.

 

F. Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policy Statement

The University of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution and is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, disability, marital status, arrest and court record, sexual orientation, or status as a covered veteran. This policy covers admission and access to, and participation, treatment, and employment in the University’s programs, activities, and services. For more information on equal opportunity and affirmative action policies and complaint procedures for the UH Mānoa campus, contact:

Students:

Alan Yang, Associate Vice Chancellor for Students, EEO/AA, Title IX & ADA Coordinator, 956-3290 (Voice/Text)

Employees:

Mie Watanabe, EEO/AA Director, Title IX & ADA Coordinator, 966-7077 (Voice/Text)

E-mail:

eeo@hawaii.edu

Students with Disabilities:

Ann Ito, KOKUA, Program Director, 956-7511 (Voice/Text)

This handbook is available in alternate format upon request with print disabilities. Call Renee Kojima-Itagaki at 956-8410 for assistance.

The KOKUA Program will assist with document transcription of instructional materials (including examinations) and will advise departments on how to prepare non-instructional materials.

Please address all inquiries to:

Graduate Chair

Department of Philosophy

2530 Dole Street, Sakamaki D-305

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96822-2383

Telephone: (808) 956-8783 or (808) 956-8410

Email: bontekoe@hawaii.edu or renee@hawaii.edu

Fax: (808) 956-9228

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s